Tamar Estuary and Esk Rivers (TEER) Program

The TEER Program is a collaboration between agencies responsible for the management of the Tamar Estuary and Esk Rivers waterways.

NRM North Involvement

The Tamar Estuary & Esk Rivers (TEER) Program aims to improve our scientific understanding of the issues impacting the TEER waterways in a coordinated approach to manage and guide investment to protect, maintain and enhance the Tamar Estuary and Esk Rivers systems from 'catchment to coast'.

NRM North is pleased to host the secretariat of the TEER Program and has been an active collaborator in the program since its establishment in 2008. Information sharing and a coordinated management approach between the program collaborators help to guide investment in activities to protect, restore and enhance the Tamar Estuary and Esk Rivers systems.

Improving water quality in such a complex system requires collaborative action, thus, the TEER Water Quality Improvement Plan 2015 was developed to provide a comprehensive understanding of water quality issues in the kanamaluka / Tamar estuary and its tributaries, and identify priority activities to address these issues. The plan provides direction to stakeholders and a framework to report on progress towards achieving and updating these targets.

The Tamar Estuary River Health Action Plan (RHAP) builds on the TEER Program’s work by identifying investment priorities and providing advice and management recommendations to the Government.

TEER logo website photo 2-13

Learn more about the TEER Program

Discover more about their projects, events and more.

Collaborators

The TEER Program's collaborators work together to provide a coordinated management approach that guides investment in activities to protect, restore, and enhance the Tamar Estuary and Esk Rivers systems from 'catchment to coast'.

Collaborators

The TEER Program's collaborators work together to provide a coordinated management approach that guides investment in activities to protect, restore, and enhance the Tamar Estuary and Esk Rivers systems from 'catchment to coast'.