Tamar Estuary and Esk Rivers Program (TEER)

Established in 2008, the TEER program is a partnership between agencies responsible for the management of the Tamar Estuary and Esk Rivers waterways. The TEER program aims to improve our scientific understanding of the issues impacting the TEER waterways in a coordinated approach to manage and guide investment to protect, maintain and enhance the Tamar Estuary and Esk Rivers systems from 'catchment to coast'.

TEER catchment
The TEER Program focuses on the catchment area of the Tamar Estuary and Esk Rivers.

Focus

The TEER Strategic Plan was developed by the TEER Partners and describes the key strategies TEER works towards:

  • work together with program partners and the Tamar Estuary Management Taskforce (TEMT) to provide integrated governance, planning and management;
  • understand and advise on waterway health; and
  • build community knowledge and awareness of the Tamar Estuary and Esk Rivers systems.

Value

The TEER catchment covers 10,000 square kilometres, fed by the North and South Esk Rivers and drains approximately 15 percent of Tasmania. It supports a diverse range of social, recreational, environmental and economic values that are highly valued by the community, including agriculture and aquaculture production, industrial operations such as those at Bell Bay, energy generation, recreational pursuits, tourism and educational activities and valued waterfront commercial and residential areas.

The TEER catchment is home to some of the most productive agricultural land in Tasmania. It has rich and diverse aquatic ecosystems and incorporates several large conservation areas including the Ben Lomond National Park, the Tamar River Wildlife Sanctuary and the Tamar River Mouth Nature Reserve. The area also contains a number of species listed under the Tasmanian Threatened Species Act 1995 and the Australian Government's Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, including Green and Gold frogs (Litoria raniformis), native fish such as Australian Grayling and Galaxids, and a variety of endangered threatened fauna and flora species present within riparian zones.

Aerial shot of the kanamaluka_tamar
The kanamaluka/Tamar is Australia's longest navigable estuary at 70km.
Black Swan swimming in waters of Tamar Island
Black Swans and their cygnets are a common sight on the kanamaluka/Tamar.

Delivery

The TEER Program works to improve waterway health through:

Knowledge and awareness is delivered to the community in:

  • Gambusia Community Awareness and Education
  • Tamar Estuary Report Card and associated fact sheets

Quick Q&A

What influences the health of the Tamar estuary?

The health of the kanamaluka/Tamar estuary is influenced by the City of Launceston’s combined sewerage and stormwater system, inability to flush sediment due to marine tides meeting freshwater inflows, agricultural practices further up in the catchment, historical industrial practices, outflows from sewage treatment plants throughout the kanamaluka/Tamar estuary, river floods and man-made changes to the flow and channel of the estuary.

What about sedimentation & contaminants?

Sediment input from the greater catchment area into the river systems has contributed to the siltation of the kanamaluka/Tamar estuary. Sediment carried with surface runoff into the rivers brings with it nutrients and heavy metals.

A legacy of historic mining in the upper catchment has also impacted on the overall condition of the river systems and contributed to the contaminants in the estuary. Improving the water quality in the TEER catchment will assist in the long-term sustainable management of this resource and the ecosystem health of the kanamaluka/Tamar estuary.

Partners

Partners of the TEER Program work together to provide a coordinated management approach that guides investment in activities to protect, restore and enhance the Tamar Estuary and Esk Rivers systems from 'catchment to coast'.

Australian Government Logo
Tas Govt resized
city of launceston_coloured_400x300
westtamar_coloured_400x300
northernmidlands_coloured_400x300
George Town Council_coloured_400x300
MVC_logo_400x300
EPA_coloured_400x300
hydro_coloured_400x300
TasWater_coloured_400x300
Bellbayaluminium_coloured_400x300
South32_coloured_400x300
DairyTas_coloured_400x300
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IMAS_coloured_400x300
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Tasmanian Irrigation logo
AMC Logo

Partners

Partners of the TEER Program work together to provide a coordinated management approach that guides investment in activities to protect, restore and enhance the Tamar Estuary and Esk Rivers systems from 'catchment to coast'.

Australian Government Logo
Tas Govt resized
city of launceston_coloured_400x300
northernmidlands_coloured_400x300
westtamar_coloured_400x300
George Town Council_coloured_400x300
MVC_logo_400x300
EPA_coloured_400x300
hydro_coloured_400x300
TasWater_coloured_400x300
Bellbayaluminium_coloured_400x300
South32_coloured_400x300
DairyTas_coloured_400x300
petuna_coloured_400x300
IMAS_coloured_400x300

Water Program & TEER Projects

Water Program

Return to the Water Program.

Working together to manage the TEER

Learn how we are working together for healthy waterways.

Ecosystem health of the Tamar

Data collected under the Ecosystem Health Assessment Program is used to produce the Tamar Estuary Report Card.

Monitoring water quality in the TEER

Learn more about the Water Quality Improvement Plan.

Managing stormwater in Northern Tasmania

Learn how we're improving stormwater quality management across the region.

Protecting the supply of drinking water

Shared information and resources to improve the management strategies used at Lake Trevallyn.

Biological values of the TEER

Learn about what calls the Tamar estuary and Esk Rivers home.